Trauma Research Foundation Social Justice Summit 2022

January 14-16th

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MAKING A DIFFERENCE: Self in Community - Empowerment and Transformation in the Healing of Trauma

Dates: January 14-16, 2022 – Live | Virtual Event

TRF is excited to announce our 2nd Annual Social Justice Summit. The Social Justice Summit’s purpose is as follows:

  • To address trauma as a social, political and collective issue, not just an individual experience.
  • To showcase and address the social contexts for and in which trauma happens — Inequality, poverty, racism, homophobia, sexism, war.
  • To address trauma as a social and collective experience.
  • To address the limited accessibility of mental health services and treatment for the most traumatized populations.
  • To showcase and present new models of services that provide mental health support and treatment for underserved, underrepresented people in need of care.
  • To raise funds for scholarships and provide collaborative opportunities and access to all other Trauma Research Foundation programming.

We invite you to join us in virtual community as we explore vitally important issues in the realm of social justice and healing from trauma. Our presenters will speak on visibility and inclusion, psychedelics and social justice, healing for incarcerated trauma survivors, the intersection of community healing through the public school system, and the importance of embodied awareness for healing. With a special panel hosted by Chacruna Institute of Psychedelic Plant Medicines.  

Program offers 14.5 Live CE credits (scroll down for more information).

Enduring /Home Study CE is also offered for those who cannot attend live.  

FOR THOSE WHO CANNOT ATTEND THE EVENT LIVE OR IN FULL, THE SUMMIT WILL BE RECORDED IN FULL AND AVAILABLE IN YOUR TRF ACCOUNT FOR 30 DAYS.

2022 Speakers + Sessions

Janina Fisher

Janina Fisher, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist and former instructor, Harvard Medical School.  An international expert on the treatment of trauma, she is the author of Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors: Overcoming Self-Alienation (2017), Transforming the Living Legacy of Trauma: a Workbook for Survivors and Therapists (2021) and The Living Legacy of Trauma Flip Chart: a Psychoeducational In-Session Tool for Clients and Therapists (in press).  She is best known for her work on integrating neurobiologically-informed interventions into traditional psychotherapy.

 

Session Title: BEING BIPOC: THE ONGOING CHALLENGES OF VISIBILITY AND INVISIBILITY

With: Janina Fisher, Debra Chatman-Finley, and Gliceria Pérez

Description: Centuries of systemic and institutionalized racism by those with power and privilege (mostly white) have left an indelible legacy of implicit bias in our society.  Even those who eschew racism and consciously support creating an anti-racist culture may fail to see how their own biases result is that lack of awareness of how their privilege contributes to the experience of visibility versus invisibility in the BIPOC community.  BIPOC individuals are often either racially invisible or far “too visible” to their white counterparts

 

The experiences of being dangerously visible or not seen at all can be emotionally threatening but also physically dangerous.  Invisibility triggers feeling of disrespected, devalued, and  deprived of dignity, resulting in shame, anger, and depression.  Biased negative visibility is threatening and dangerous, not just demeaning.

 

To address the implicit racial biases that contribute to visibility and invisibility requires those with racial privilege to not only be aware of but committed to engaging in authentic conversations and proactive activities that lessen the harmful impact of being unseen or seen as “other.”  

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Define implicit bias and describe how to recognize its signs
  • List ways in which BIPOC individuals experience invisibility
  • Specify negative ramifications of visibility
  • Discuss the ways that visibility and invisibility pose emotional and/or physical threat to BIPOC individuals

Reuben Jonathan Miller

As a chaplain at the Cook County Jail in Chicago and as a sociologist studying mass incarceration, Dr. Reuben Jonathan Miller has spent years alongside prisoners, formerly incarcerated people, their families, and their friends to understand the lifelong burden that even a single arrest can entail. What his work reveals is a simple, if overlooked truth: life after incarceration is its own form of prison.

Miller’s new book, Halfway Home: Race, Punishment and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration, is a portrait of the many ways mass incarceration reaches into American life, sustaining structural racism and redrawing the boundaries of our democracyDrawing from fifteen years of research, over 250 in-depth interviews with citizens whose lives have been touched by the criminal justice system, and his own experience as the son and brother of incarcerated Black men, Miller shows how the American carceral system was not created to rehabilitate. Instead he reveals how its design keeps classes of Americans impoverished, unstable, and disenfranchised long after they’ve paid their debt to society.

Session Title: Halfway Home: Race, Punishment and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration

Description: 1 in 2 people in our country has a loved one who has been to jail or prison. It wasn’t always this way. As a chaplain at the Cook County Jail in Chicago and as a sociologist studying mass incarceration, Dr. Reuben Jonathan Miller has spent years alongside prisoners, formerly incarcerated people, their families, and their friends to understand the lifelong burden that even a single arrest can entail. What his work reveals is a simple, if overlooked truth: life after incarceration is its own form of prison. In this session, we will discuss the many ways mass incarceration reaches into American life, sustaining structural racism and redrawing the boundaries of our democracy. Drawing from fifteen years of research and practice, and his own experience as the son and brother of incarcerated Black men, Miller will discuss the contours of the carceral system we’ve made, its role in perpetuating new forms of trauma and harm, and, more importantly, how we might find our way out. 

Objective

  • To understand how mass incarceration and our propensity to punish has shaped family life
  • To better understand the complex social histories and experiences of the people we’ve learned to throw away—people who have themselves been the victims of violence and harm
  • To examine our role in addressing the trauma and harm caused by the over use of incarceration

Chris Wilson

Chris Wilson works as a visual artist, author, film producer, social justice advocate, and entrepreneur. Through his work, he investigates societal injustices, human relationships, and public policies. His book, the Master Plan, continues to inspire people from all walks of life. His artwork is collected and displayed internationally and his production company, Cuttlefish, has produced several successful films, including The Box which was recently featured in the Tribeca Film Festival. He is also the founder of the Chris Wilson Foundation, which supports social entrepreneurs and prison education, including re-entry and financial literacy for returning citizens, as well as art-related programs.

Title Options:

Building the Infrastructure: How Care Opportunities Motivate Individuals to Healing 

Description:

Chris Wilson will be speaking on his own story of resilience: his journey from poverty and prison to artist, author, businessman, and speaker. While Chris’s history is of course encouraging, it also made clear the countless ways that trauma-informed healing and effective support remain unavailable to so many who need it. As we come, finally, to a national conversation of collective trauma, we realize that collective healing is all too absent in our institutions. Chris will discuss the ways that trauma-informed care can be brought into schools, community centers, prisons, and the like—motivating individuals to self-discovery and providing the support necessary to follow through. 

Objectives:

  1. Understand the daily, on-the-ground challenges that affect people living through poverty, racism, and other societal ills.
  2. Provide a picture of what is needed—and when—to help individuals and communities lead healthy, productive, and joyful lives

Staci K Haines

Staci K. Haines is the co-founder of Generative Somatics, a multiracial social justice organization bringing somatics to social and environmental justice leaders, organizations, and alliances. Haines is a senior teacher in the field of Somatics and designs and leads programs in Embodied Leadership, Somatics and Trauma, and Somatics and Social Justice, as well as leading teacher training programs. She has a somatic coaching practice that primarily serves social movement leaders and trauma and violence survivors and has been working and teaching in the field of Somatics for the last 22 years.

Title: Embodied Transformation and Social Justice

Description:

  • How do we align our actions with our visions and values?
  • How do we build relationships of equity and interdependence, when we are deeply shaped by injustice and separation?
  • How do we be a part of movements for social and climate justice, and bring our embodied practices and trauma healing with us?

Somatics, with a social analysis, can help us live into these questions. Embodied transformation and purposeful practice can work with the deep shaping of both privilege and oppression, heal the impacts of violence and numbing, and deepen our capacities for both empathy and bold action. While Somatics in the West has most often been used for individual healing alone, it has much more to offer. With an understanding of systemic inequity, and a commitment to systemic change, Somatics can powerfully contribute to personal, collective, and systemic transformation.

Objectives: 

  • Discover the connection between personal and social transformation and how each can serve the other
  • Learn how we are shaped by and embody our personal experiences and our social conditions, even when we don’t agree with them.
  • Explore somatic practices and processes that can serve healing and action for social change

Liz Dozier

Founder & CEO, Chicago Beyond 

 

From education to activism, Liz Dozier has spent her career working tirelessly to disrupt the culture of inequity that is often pervasive in urban neighborhoods. Her ambition is born from her experiences as a teacher and principal in Chicago Public Schools.

 

In 2008, Dozier was selected by Arne Duncan, CEO of Chicago Public Schools at the time and later U.S. Secretary of Education, to participate in a bold strategy for improving Chicago’s lowest performing schools, known as the Turnaround Model. Later, Dozier became the principal at Fenger High School, at the time known as one of the most violent in the city of Chicago. Keenly aware of how traumatic events outside of the classroom were affecting her students, Dozier’s method to turn around Fenger included the adoption of restorative justice and mental health and wellness strategies. Fenger was the first school to institute CARE Teams to surround youth in crisis, and the entire staff at Fenger was trained in de-escalation and trauma-responsive approaches. Dozier also implemented grief counseling, and anger group therapy sessions for students undergoing similar life experiences. Due to these intensive tactics and new practices, under her leadership the school experienced a decrease in its dropout rate from 19% to 2%, a 40% increase in Freshman On-Track to graduate, and double-digit increases in attendance and the school’s state graduation rate. During Dozier’s tenure from 2008-2015, Fenger became one of the district leaders in restorative justice, social and emotional learning and academic interventions.

 

Today, Liz Dozier is the Founder & CEO of Chicago Beyond, an impact investor designed to ensure all young people have the opportunity to reach their fullest potential.

 

Session Title: 

Centering Equity, Building Wellness

Description:

Join Liz Dozier in a session dedicated to discussing trauma-informed practices through the lens of her own personal story. Through her experience as a high school principal once deemed “the most violent and underperforming school” in the state of Illinois, she will share what is possible when individuals challenge the institutions and systems that stand in the way of equity and freedom for all young people. From creating lasting impact at a single school to launching a Healing Centered Framework for all 330,000 Chicago Public Schools students, Liz will discuss the importance of keeping equity at the center of change, especially while young people are experiencing trauma, and how this work has led her to launching Chicago Beyond, an impact investor creating systems change in Chicago and beyond.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize how our own biases create barriers to equity 
  2. Provide an alternative pathway forward that includes a new orientation to change  

Josefin Wikström

Josefin Wikström is the Prison Yoga Project’s (PYP) Program Director and Training Coordinator for Europe and  the founder of Trauma-Adapted Yoga (TAY) in Sweden. She has been the primary teacher for the  Swedish Probation services and co-developed the national, evidence-based Swedish Krimyoga  program. She is the national program developer for the current research on the therapeutic effects  from Trauma Informed Yoga within Sweden’s forensic psychiatry.

Josefin is the co-author of Freedom from the Inside, A Woman’s Yoga Practice Guide, a book written together with PYP’s founder James Fox and published in 2020, specifically intended for incarcerated women.

Session Title: Trauma Informed Yoga as Complementary Care

Description: Prison Yoga Project (PYP) is an international organisation that supports incarcerated adults and youth,  prison systems, forensic psychiatry units, trauma exposed communities, and survivors of crime with  programs to enhance well-being and promote rehabilitation, reduce recidivism, and improve public  safety. Central to our work are the concepts of restorative justice and social activism.  Most incarcerated people have a history of complex, interpersonal trauma. Unless this unresolved  trauma is addressed, the prospects for re-offending persist.  

This will provide an experiential presentation on why and how the Prison Yoga Project (PYP) provides  trauma-informed, mindfulness based yoga practices and movement therapy as a means of self empowerment and self-rehabilitation inside prisons and correctional settings. 

Objectives:  

  • Provide an understanding of the unique socio-cultural environment of incarceration and the causitive  social justice issues that influence criminality worldwide. 
  • The global therapeutic potential, and past and current research on PYP programs. • How PYP’s programs reduce the physical, mental, and emotional impacts and healthcare costs  associated with stress and unresolved trauma.  
  • How PYP’s methodology influences the development of self-awareness, self-worth, empathy, and  compassion that leads to positive personal and pro-social choices.  

Learn more about the project here: www.prisonyoga.org

Fritzi Horstman

Fritzi Horstman is the Founder and Executive Director of the Compassion Prison Project, an organization dedicated to creating trauma-informed prisons and communities. The first day Fritzi stepped inside a maximum security prison she realized it was actually a trauma center.  She knew at that moment something needed to be done to change the system so she produced and directed the now viral video “Step Inside the Circle” with 235 incarcerated men addressing their Adverse Childhood Experiences.  Currently, she is creating a 12-part video series about childhood trauma to be distributed to every prison across the U.S. and abroad. Fritzi has also produced HBO’s “The Defiant Ones” directed by Allen Hughes which has garnered several awards including a Grammy for Best Music Film. Her first feature, “Take A Number,” which she wrote, produced, and directed, debuted at the Slamdance festival and premiered on HBO.  Fritzi  received a Bachelor of Arts in Film and English from Vassar College.

Title: Trauma Informed Prisons

Description: Prisons are the largest mental health facilities in the US but do not provide adequate mental health care

Based on our ACE Surveys of over 3,000 incarcerated men and women, 98% have a least one ACE not to mention the other adversities experienced because of poverty. Also, the average life expectancy of a correctional officers is 59 years.

Most people working and living in prison:

  • Don’t know they’re traumatized
  • Don’t understand that their symptoms stem from trauma
  • Don’t have tools to heal

Trauma-Informed Prisons would:

  • Change the way prisons operate
  • Diminish trauma and PTSD in prisons
  • Create safer environments for both officers and incarcerated men and women
  • Create potential for a truly rewarding life

Gliceria Pérez

Gliceria Pérez, LCSW is a bilingual Licensed Clinical Social Worker with a Master of Social Work degree from Fordham University Graduate School of Social Service. She has years of experience in the fields of mental health, trauma, domestic violence, and child abuse/neglect. For the past 14 years, Ms. Pérez has provided short-term therapy to traumatized immigrant children/adolescents and their families. Ms. Pérez is trained in Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR) and completed the Certificate Program in Traumatic Stress Studies at the Trauma Center at JRI as well as the Multicultural Family Institute.  Since 2005, she has been an Adjunct Faculty at New York University Silver School of Social Work.  Ms. Pérez conducts workshops/presentations – Wounded Parenting: The intersection of Complex and Racial Trauma in Parents of Color, Parts 1 & 2; and Adelantar La Raza/Advance the Race: An Afro-Cuban American Experience.  She maintains a private practice in New Jersey.

Session Title: BEING BIPOC: THE ONGOING CHALLENGES OF VISIBILITY AND INVISIBILITY

With: Janina Fisher, Debra Chatman-Finley, and Gliceria Pérez

Description: Centuries of systemic and institutionalized racism by those with power and privilege (mostly white) have left an indelible legacy of implicit bias in our society.  Even those who eschew racism and consciously support creating an anti-racist culture may fail to see how their own biases result is that lack of awareness of how their privilege contributes to the experience of visibility versus invisibility in the BIPOC community.  BIPOC individuals are often either racially invisible or far “too visible” to their white counterparts

 

The experiences of being dangerously visible or not seen at all can be emotionally threatening but also physically dangerous.  Invisibility triggers feeling of disrespected, devalued, and  deprived of dignity, resulting in shame, anger, and depression.  Biased negative visibility is threatening and dangerous, not just demeaning.

 

To address the implicit racial biases that contribute to visibility and invisibility requires those with racial privilege to not only be aware of but committed to engaging in authentic conversations and proactive activities that lessen the harmful impact of being unseen or seen as “other.”  

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Define implicit bias and describe how to recognize its signs
  • List ways in which BIPOC individuals experience invisibility
  • Specify negative ramifications of visibility
  • Discuss the ways that visibility and invisibility pose emotional and/or physical threat to BIPOC individuals

Gang Badoy Capati

As a young social worker, Gang Badoy Capati spent a decade inside the Maximum Security Prison of the Philippines as a trauma therapist through art and literature. Primarily a writer, Ms. Capati is a mental health clinician who takes care of elite national athletes in the Philippines and is now the Lead Therapist of Project: Steady Asia.  (PSA)  PSA is a webwide mental health initiative and TRF Therapeutic Alliance member focused on mental health approaches mindful of the cultural nuances of SouthEast Asia.

Title: DECADE IN PRISON: Snapshots of Justice Philippine-Style 

Summary: A raw and honest conversation on stories of trauma, heartbreak, art, and tiny triumphs inside the Maximum Security Prison of the Philippines. Take a peek at a learning program inside the Philippines’ former death row and how an art therapist, without funding, found ways to make lives of the inmates serving reclusion perpetua a little less grim. 

Objectives:

  1. To offer a front-row seat of the texture of things inside a South East Asian prison and witness efforts of private citizens to contribute to a more rehabilitative approach to justice.
  2. To hear stories proving trauma-informed approaches will always make way for a more healing system inside prisons. 
  3. To see a quick overview of the social justice situation in the Philippines under a narcissistic leadership and how culture and past collective traumas made way for such a government to take the lead.

Debra Chatman-Finley

Debra Chatman-Finley is a Licensed Professional Counselor and National Board Certified Counselor in private practice in Montclair, NJ. She is an Adjunct Professor at New York University where she teaches Racial and Social Micro Aggressions in Clinical Practice.  She is the former Director of Clinical Services at The Resource Center for Women and Their Families, providing counseling services for domestic violence victims.  

Ms. Chatman-Finley earned her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Seton Hall University and her Master’s degree in Counseling Psychology from the College of Saint Elizabeth.  She is also a graduate and former Associate Faculty of the Multicultural Family Institute and is trained in Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR). 

Session Title: BEING BIPOC: THE ONGOING CHALLENGES OF VISIBILITY AND INVISIBILITY

With: Janina Fisher, Debra Chatman-Finley, and Gliceria Pérez

Description: Centuries of systemic and institutionalized racism by those with power and privilege (mostly white) have left an indelible legacy of implicit bias in our society.  Even those who eschew racism and consciously support creating an anti-racist culture may fail to see how their own biases result is that lack of awareness of how their privilege contributes to the experience of visibility versus invisibility in the BIPOC community.  BIPOC individuals are often either racially invisible or far “too visible” to their white counterparts

 

The experiences of being dangerously visible or not seen at all can be emotionally threatening but also physically dangerous.  Invisibility triggers feeling of disrespected, devalued, and  deprived of dignity, resulting in shame, anger, and depression.  Biased negative visibility is threatening and dangerous, not just demeaning.

 

To address the implicit racial biases that contribute to visibility and invisibility requires those with racial privilege to not only be aware of but committed to engaging in authentic conversations and proactive activities that lessen the harmful impact of being unseen or seen as “other.”  

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Define implicit bias and describe how to recognize its signs
  • List ways in which BIPOC individuals experience invisibility
  • Specify negative ramifications of visibility
  • Discuss the ways that visibility and invisibility pose emotional and/or physical threat to BIPOC individuals

Lisa Pendleton

Lisa Pendleton, LMFT is the owner and founder of the Neurofeedback Clinic of Northern Colorado. The Clinic has been providing neurofeedback assisted psychotherapy to diverse populations in Northern Colorado and surrounding communities since 2012.  Currently, the Clinic provides services to over 500 clients per week with an emphasis on equitable access to mental health services. 

Ms. Pendleton is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist with a Master’s Degree in Human Development and Family Studies from Colorado State University. As a trauma informed therapist, she has experience and training in Neurofeedback, Internal Family Systems Therapy, (IFS), and Eye-Movement Desensitization Reprocessing, (EMDR). Prior to founding the Neurofeedback Clinic of Northern Colorado, she provided counseling in a non-profit sexual abuse treatment center and a private practice.  

Title: Benefits of Neurofeedback Assisted Psychotherapy for Office-based or Telehealth Practices

Description: This session will explore client profiles and the client experience over time through neurofeedback assisted psychotherapy. This session will also detail practitioner experience in providing neurofeedback assisted psychotherapy in the context of a pandemic including office-based and teletherapy modalities. Assessing and addressing common barriers to mental health treatment for marginalized groups will also be covered. 

Objectives:

  • To learn typical outcomes for neurofeedback assisted psychotherapy through case studies
  • To learn how to identify and overcome typical barriers for mental health services for underserved, underrepresented, and marginalized people

Ismail Ali

As the Director of Policy and Advocacy at the Multidisciplinary Association of Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), Ismail (he/they) advocates to eliminate barriers to psychedelic therapy and research, develops and implements legal and policy strategy, and supports MAPS’ governance, non-profit, and ethics work. Ismail also serves on the Board of Directors for Sage Institute and is a founding Board member of the Psychedelic Bar Association. Ismail is also affiliated with or has served on leadership roles with numerous organizations including Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Chacruna Institute, and the Ayahuasca Defense Fund, and is passionate about setting groundwork for an equitable and compassionate post-prohibition world.

Title: Psychedelic JEDIs: Ensuring Justice, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (JEDI) in Psychedelics

Description: Psychedelic justice moves beyond the focus on individual freedom and instead pulls for a societal level social justice movement. Such a movement demands that we focus on justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) broadly and comprehensively. Justice, as proposed here, requires we center on the collective, communal needs of all members of society. Enacting true justice requires we do so with an intersectional lens that prioritizes the needs of those who embody multiple intersecting marginalized identities because creating a psychedelic community that best meets the needs of those who stand in these intersections elevates us all. To this end, this presentation will discuss strategies for moving toward psychedelic justice that liberate society and all of humanity. 

Objectives: 

  • Outline the ways institutional and systemic injustices in society become embedded in the psychedelic society.
  • Identify justice, equity, diversity, and inclusivity (JEDI) challenges in the psychedelic community.
  • Provide strategies for increasing justice, equity, diversity, and inclusivity as the psychedelic gains greater acceptance in society.

Erika Dyck

Erika Dyck is a Professor and a Canada Research Chair in the History of Health & Social Justice at the University of Saskatchewan. She is the author of Psychedelic Psychiatry (2008); Facing Eugenics (2013); editor of A Culture’s Catalyst (2016) co-author of Managing Madness (2017) and Challenging Choices (2020), and co-editor of Psychedelic Prophets (2018) and In the Acid Room (2021). Erika is also a Board Member of Chacruna Institute for Psychedelic Plants, and Associate Director of Chacruna Canada.

Title: Are psychedelics a pathway to better social justice?

Description: Can psychedelics once again emerge as a cultural lubricant for inspiring social justice? Historically psychedelics became part of a 1960s cultural phenomenon which scholars and authorities associated with counterculture. For some, the counterculture represented hope and an optimistic path for changing entrenched patterns of injustice. But, for others, the counterculture seemed poised to unleash chaos and disorder into the world. Today, amidst a psychedelic resurgence we are facing similar pressures to contain psychedelics within a strictly medical category out of concern that more widespread use could lead to a return to a 1960s-styled counterculture. This presentation looks back at this history and considers the relationship between psychedelics and social justice movements, reflecting on how psychedelic movements have failed to effectively promote diversity.

  Objectives

  • Appreciate how the historical reputation for psychedelic movements in the past emphasized Anglo, white, and often male perspectives
  • Analyze how past psychedelic movements incorporated social justice themes as part of the counterculture
  • Consider what these historical lessons might tell us about psychedelics and social justice in the 21st century

Prentis Hemphill

Prentis Hemphill is a writer, an embodiment facilitator, political organizer and therapist. They are the Founder and Director of The Embodiment Institute and The Black Embodiment Initiative, and the host of the acclaimed podcast, Finding Our Way. For the last ten years, Prentis has practiced and taught somatics in social movement organizations and offered embodied practice during moments of social unrest and organizational upheaval. They have taught embodied leadership with Black Organizing for Leadership and Dignity and generative somatics and served as the Healing Justice Director of Black Lives Matter Global Network from 2016 to 2019. Their work and writing have appeared in the New York Times, the Huffington Post. They are a contributor to ‘You are Your Best Thing’, edited by Tarana Burke and Brene Brown, ‘Holding Change’ by Adrienne Maree Brown, and ‘The Politics of Trauma’ by Staci Haines. They live in North Carolina on a small farm with their partner, two dogs, two chickens while working on an upcoming book on healing justice. 

Title: Healing Justice and Embodied Leadership

Description: We know that our relationships with each other are the foundation for the change work we do. This workshop will explore the impact of trauma and oppression on our individual and collective bodies. It will help us engage trauma-healing and resilience-building in our physiology and through practice. We will also cultivate practices to strengthen our inherent resilience to help us live out bold visions of interdependence, sustainability, and the abolition of harmful systems. We will discuss the importance of developing embodied and emotional capacities that underpin these visions

Objectives: ​​

  • Participants will understand the necessity of collective trauma healing for social justice and power building.
  • Participants will understand how embodiment can reinforce historical power dynamics or be the process through which we interrupt entrenched power dynamics and create a more equitable future.

Trina Clayeux

Dr. Clayeux is the CEO of Give an Hour, a national non-profit with a network of over 4500 volunteer licensed mental health professionals committed to providing no cost, barrier-free care to populations in need. Prior to Give An Hour, Dr. Clayeux served as chief operations officer for social impact nonprofits addressing educational, socioemotional, and affordable housing disparities across low-wealth communities and as a director and assistant dean for both the K-12 and community college systems. Dr. Clayeux earned a master of public administration from Portland State University and a PhD in leadership studies from Gonzaga University along with certifications in change management, lean process improvement, and program evaluation. She’s been recognized by the National Association of Development Boards for innovation, the Sailing Award for leadership excellence, and the Chase Foundation for a nonprofit of the year award. In addition, Dr. Clayeux has presented at a number of state and national conferences related to human centered design programs for opportunity youth, trauma informed practices in workforce development, and a replication model for program design, delivery, and impact serving vulnerable populations.

Title: Giving Help and Hope: Give an Hour Case Studies of Trauma & Healing

 Description: Since 2005, Give an Hour’s national network of licensed mental health providers have been providing hope and help to trauma survivors, first with the military veteran community and later expanded support into other communities impacted by natural and manmade disasters. Our select case studies tell the stories of trauma healing through community and connection. In the first case study, Give an Hour partnered to provide individual and peer supports in Ventura County, California following back to back tragedies of mass gun violence and devastating wildfires.  In Washington DC, Give an Hour provides trauma informed mental health services to victims of crime and those involved in the justice system as part of Mayor Bowser’s initiative to promote healing and reduce revictimization in order to prevent future violence. This session will explore the healing power of peer support and community, explore lessons learned, and provide space for a call-to-action to promote trauma recovery and resiliency across communities.   

 Objectives:

  • An understanding of the power of community healing for trauma survivors
  • An offering of lessons learned in healing communities through case studies
  • A dialogue about gaps and solutions in accessing on demand mental health care for trauma survivors

Alta Starr

Alta Starr is the Director of Training for B.O.L.D. (Black Organizing for Leadership and Dignity) and has taught embodied leadership and trauma healing with Strozzi Institute and generative somatics. She has a private practice as a somatic coach and bodyworker in New York City and works as a consultant to organizations to help them build high-performing, effectively coordinated teams. Her prior experience includes a twenty-five year career in philanthropy, including at the Ford Foundation, with a focus on building political power in underserved and marginalized communities through organizing.  

Title: Liberation Through Embodiment

 

Description: “Why feel?”” is one of the questions we repeat throughout embodied leadership trainings, to invite participants to articulate what the hard work of reclaiming their experience of aliveness means to them.  Exploring this question allows people to name their unique personal visions for healing and liberation, both individual and societal, and we repeat the exploration to ensure they do more than answer intellectually, but rather, find the answers in their own bodies.  As teachers and practitioners, we can present compelling theory and inspiring research, we can offer convincing frameworks and useful practices, but it is this discovery and refining of their own longing for life that carries participants through the challenging work of embodied transformation.  Of course, one’s social location, and the degree of relative privilege, oppression, and trauma, each shape and flavor how that connection to core aliveness has been broken as well as maintained, and what it may take to restore it more fully.  This interactive session will examine how the process of coming back to life, to the truths in one’s embodied experience, is a basis not only for individual healing and transformation but also offer possibilities for profound social change.

 

Objectives:

  • Examine patterns of reactivity and how they are reinforced by social conditions
  • Explore the power and practice of connecting to core aliveness
  • Explore the connection between individual and collective embodied transformation

Sunny Strasburg

Sunny Strasburg is a graduate of the Certification for Psychedelic Assisted Therapy from the California Institute of Integral Studies, trained in Ketamine, MDMA and Psilocybin Assisted Psychotherapies. Sunny is the Clinical Director at TRIPP PsyAssist, developing virtual reality psychedelic support for therapists. Sunny is a lead trainer at the Ketamine Training Center, co-facilitating KAP training with Phil Wolfson, Bessel van der Kolk and other leaders in the psychedelic and trauma fields.

Sunny has developed original treatment protocols using ketamine assisted therapy and other trauma treatment methods, which she presents at conferences such as the 2021 EMDRIA Worldwide Virtual Conference. Sunny co-founded the nonprofit organization, Indra’s Net Coalition with Dr. Phil Wolfson. She is trained by MAPS, Compass Pathways, Ketamine Research Foundation and Synthesis.

Title: The Indra’s Net Coalition (INC)—Treating Trauma and PTSD Internationally with Sharing Groups—Expression, Sharing of Experiences, Feelings and Coping Strategies Creating Connection and Healing. www.indrasnetcoalition.org 

Description: INC is an arm of the nonprofit, the Ketamine Research Foundation. INC emphasizes the connection of all beings and organizes six session groups, called Sharing Groups, with a format that is adaptable to the range of trauma and the resultant suffering. This format is adaptable to cultures, is easily translated, and organizes around the particularities of trauma themes such as, Covid 19, racial trauma, abuse and violence, the effects of global climate change. INC is open to proposals for support from those interested in their own specific circumstances. Sharing Groups are free to Participants. INC supervises, vets and provides free online training for Facilitators. Facilitators are paid per group the same stipend no matter their location. The INC Sharing Group is not a psychotherapy model, but rather organized around exchange, sharing and witnessing, with healing and community as its therapeutic outcome. Our format has been developed with both core tenets that motivate and guide the sharing and guidelines for participation and behavior in the group. INC provides direct consultation and support to Facilitators and assists in the formation of Sharing Groups. We are actively seeking coalition partners and partners include; The Chopra Foundation, ICEERs in Spain and the Boston International Trauma Conference. 

Objectives: 

  • Enhance awareness of the many traumatizing aspects of the current global crisis, and the benefits of sharing the experiences of trauma.
  • Presentation of our Format for Sharing Groups and how they serve to relieve social isolation and the effects of trauma. 
  • Develop interest in becoming Facilitators and Sharing Group Participants, as well as coalition building for new mutually supportive partnerships.

Phil Wolfson

Phil Wolfson, MD is the co-founder of Indra’s Net Coalition with Sunny Strasburg, an approach to mitigating the effects of trauma by sharing and connection. He is the creator of a new psychotherapy modality based on use of the medicine ketamine—Ketamine Assisted Psychotherapy (KAP). Phil is the CEO of the non-profit Ketamine Research Foundation and directs the training of KAP practitioners through The Ketamine Training Center—now numbering over 300 practitioners across the US and Internationally. He is the author of The Ketamine

He has been the Principal Investigator of the recently completed MAPS.org Phase 2 study of MDMA treatment for individuals with life-threatening illnesses. Dr. Wolfson’s work is the result of an intense, now many decades long, clinical psychiatry/psychotherapy practice. 

Title: The Indra’s Net Coalition (INC)—Treating Trauma and PTSD Internationally with Sharing Groups—Expression, Sharing of Experiences, Feelings and Coping Strategies Creating Connection and Healing. www.indrasnetcoalition.org 

Description: INC is an arm of the nonprofit, the Ketamine Research Foundation. INC emphasizes the connection of all beings and organizes six session groups, called Sharing Groups, with a format that is adaptable to the range of trauma and the resultant suffering. This format is adaptable to cultures, is easily translated, and organizes around the particularities of trauma themes such as, Covid 19, racial trauma, abuse and violence, the effects of global climate change. INC is open to proposals for support from those interested in their own specific circumstances. Sharing Groups are free to Participants. INC supervises, vets and provides free online training for Facilitators. Facilitators are paid per group the same stipend no matter their location. The INC Sharing Group is not a psychotherapy model, but rather organized around exchange, sharing and witnessing, with healing and community as its therapeutic outcome. Our format has been developed with both core tenets that motivate and guide the sharing and guidelines for participation and behavior in the group. INC provides direct consultation and support to Facilitators and assists in the formation of Sharing Groups. We are actively seeking coalition partners and partners include; The Chopra Foundation, ICEERs in Spain and the Boston International Trauma Conference. 

Objectives: 

  • Enhance awareness of the many traumatizing aspects of the current global crisis, and the benefits of sharing the experiences of trauma.
  • Presentation of our Format for Sharing Groups and how they serve to relieve social isolation and the effects of trauma. 
  • Develop interest in becoming Facilitators and Sharing Group Participants, as well as coalition building for new mutually supportive partnerships.

 

Linda Thai

Linda’s people are from southern Vietnam, where the river meets the ocean, and yet upstream enough that the water is sweet. The currents of life forced us to seek refuge. She spent her (confusing and messy) formative years on the lands forcibly taken from the Warrundjeri People, now known as Melbourne, Australia. She now lives and works on the traditional lands of the Tanana Athabascan People of interior Alaska. 

Nourished by the healing forces of the Alaskan wilderness and driven to heal her own unnameable pain and sorrow, she stumbled into yoga and meditation and, eventually, learned about the confluence of addiction, trauma, attachment and mental illness. The hole in her soul beckoned her to continue healing: she studied Sensorimotor Psychotherapy, Somatic Experiencing, Brainspotting, Internal Family Systems, structural dissociation of the personality, and assisted Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, with his private small group psychotherapy workshops aimed at healing attachment trauma.

Shortly after she reclaimed the unresolved ancestral grief in her lineage, she began to serve her communities through offering trauma therapy and somatic education, based in brain- and body-based interventions through an anti-oppressive lens, as well as serving as an adjunct faculty member in the Social Work Department at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Linda strives to operate in mutuality for the purpose of empowered self-awareness, to liberate the joy and peace at the essence of our beings, and to connect us back to ourselves and to each other.

Title of Session:

Nostalgia, the pain of going home: A former child refugee’s journey of healing.

 

Description:

Leaving Vietnam at age two with my parents, as Vietnamese Boat People, has left a legacy on myself and my ancestors that has taken my entire lifetime to make sense of.  This presentation will trace the story arc of my life’s journey from the post-War Vietnam to a refugee camp to (eventually) Fairbanks, Alaska – via ashrams and meditation centers, Twelve Step meetings and grief rituals – all of which deeply informs my approach as a trauma therapist.

 

Objectives:

  • A decolonized approach to learning – via narrative reconstruction of lived experiences – to expand the conversation about intergenerational trauma to encompass the impact of forced migration, combined with acculturation and enculturation pressures upon the subsequent generation.
  • A decolonized and anti-oppressive approach to psychotherapy.

 

Mariella Norambuena

Mariella Norambuena Cid, is a Clinical Psychologist and an expert in the treatment of trauma with a Human Rights approach, for 22 years. She is a Somatic Experiencing Psychotherapist, EMDR Psychotherapist and Facilitator (Eye Movements Desensitization and Reprocessing), Psychotherapist and Full Trainer for Chile from TIC – Brain Integration Techniques, based on neuroscience and neurophysiology for the treatment of psychological and somatic trauma.

Title: Sociopolitical trauma – Perception of use of ICT, treatment of Trauma in Victims of Eye Damage during the Social Outbreak in Chile.

Description: In the context of the Social Outbreak of October 2019 in Chile, according to the report of the National Institute of Human Rights (INDH) between October 18 and November 30, 2019 (44 days), there were 358 eye traumas.

To date, there are informal data from civil organizations of approximately 550 ocular traumas. ICHTA – Chilean Institute of Advanced Therapies, from March 2020 to date serves people with eye damage derived from the PIRO (Comprehensive Ocular Repair Program) created by the Ministry of Health and social and civil organizations of Chile.

In Chile there is no State program for specialized care in trauma psychotherapy. ICHTA is the only civil organization in Chile that, due to its experience in trauma, formed a psychological health team of volunteers to care for victims of State Terrorism in Democracy.

 Objectives

  • The relevance of the application of ICT – Brain Integration Techniques in patients with sociopolitical trauma, as an area of ​​innovative knowledge, with positive results and testimonies from the patients.
  • Create awareness in mental health professionals of the need and urgency of training in Trauma Therapy with a Human Rights approach.
  • Present results that must be investigated and demonstrated in depth and academically, for their use in the field of psychological health in Chile and the world in people with sociopolitical and psychosocial trauma.

Beth Gibbs

Beth Gibbs, MA, C-IAYT, is a certified yoga therapist, through the International Association of Yoga Therapists, a faculty member at the Kripalu School of Integrative Yoga Therapy and a guest presenter at The Graduate Institute. She holds a masters’ degree in Yoga Therapy and Mind/Body Health from Lesley University in Cambridge, MA., is a member of the writing team for the Yoga for Times of Change blog and a guest blogger for Caregiver Wellness Retreat, YogaUonline, and YogaTherapy.Health. She has over twenty years experience teaching, training and mentoring yoga students, teachers, and yoga therapists-in-training from all over the world to implement self-awareness skills in their professional work and personal practice. She has published two books, Ogi Bogi, The Elephant Yogi, for children and the adults who care for them and a personal growth book for adults, Enlighten Up! Finding Clarity, Contentment and Resilience in a Complicated World. 

Title: The Five Layers of Self-Awareness

Description: Self-awareness can be defined as the ability to see, understand and accept our thoughts, emotions, beliefs, habits and behavior without judgment. When this skill is actively employed, we see our reality as it is, and not hidden behind a veil of wishful thinking or denial. Then we can consciously choose to make changes, remain unchanged with full awareness of the consequences or find acceptance and peace of mind if change is not possible. When we cultivate self-awareness we learn how to celebrate life’s ups with balance and contentment and manage the downs with clarity and internal resilience. 

Objectives: Participants will

  • Gain an overview of the five layers of self-awareness. 
  • Be introduced to the 9-Steps to Self-Awareness.
  • Practice accessible yoga exercises for each layer.

Oludaré

Oludaré is a Balogun (Priest of Ogun), Aponni (Music Healing Ceremonial Leader), Omo Anya (Sacred Healing Drummer), Dancer and Author of Breathing With Orisha. He is a #RespiratoryActivist and believes in #RESPARATIONS- a spin off of reparations that includes the freedom and time for African Descendants to practice intentional healing through the breath, song and movements of their own ancestral lineages. Through Kìire Wellness, Oludaré brings this message to the world in a tangible, online, family friendly format. He teaches private and public chair breathing, dance, song, and music workshops that help to culturally restore African descendants while strengthening their physical and spiritual health. His work is dedicated to promoting wellness in African Descendant communities- and it all starts with the Breath.

Title: Breathing With Orisha

Description: Breathing With Orisha introduces the use of Orisha dance, song, and prayer as a technology for deep breathing, meditation, and spiritual clarity. It presents the healing philosophy and practical, daily breathing benefits of Orisha dance and song rituals. Breathing With Orisha reminds us that African Diaspora dance and song (no matter how flattering or unflattering) are the respiratory rituals and medicines created for us to be free- to keep on breathing

Objectives:

  • Restore Joy by turning African History into song, Breathwork and dance to address trauma, anxiety and stress in African Descendant communities.
  • Restore physiological balance to the Black Body, increase the spiritual-emotional intelligence of the Black Heart while challenging the mental slavery of the Black Mind.

Schedule

Friday, January 14, 2022

Session 18:30-9:30 am ET

Janina Fisher, Debra Chatman-Finley, Gliceria PérezBeing BIPOC: The Ongoing Challenges of Visibility and Invisibility

Panel 1 – 9:30-9:50 am ET

Panel discussion with Licia Sky

Session 2 –  10:00-10:50 am ET

Chris Wilson  – Building the Infrastructure: How Care Opportunities Motivate Individuals to Healing

Session 3 – 10:50-11:40 am ET

Reuben Jonathan Miller – Halfway Home: Race, Punishment and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration

Session 4 – 11:50 – 12:15 pm ET

Liz Dozier – Centering Equity, Building Wellness

Session 5 – 12:15 – 12:40 pm ET

Fritzi Horstman – Trauma Informed Prisons

Panel 2 – 12:40 – 1:10 pm ET 

Bessel van der Kolk, Chris Wilson, Reuben Jonathan Miller,  Liz Dozier, and Fritzi Horstman

Yoga Practice – 1:10-:1:40 pm ET

Beth Gibbs – 5 Layers of Self-Awareness

Session 6 –  2:10 – 3:00 pm ET 

Lisa Pendleton – Benefits of neurofeedback assisted psychotherapy for office-based or telehealth practices

Session 7  –  3:00 – 4:30pm ET

Staci Haines – Embodied Transformation and Social Justice

Session 8 – 4:40 – 5:10 pm ET

Prentis Hempill – Healing Justice and Embodied Leadership

Session 9 – 5:10 – 5:40 pm ET 

Alta Starr – Liberation Through Embodiment

Music, Dancing and Networking – 6:10 – 6:40 pm ET

Saturday, January 15, 2022

Session 10 – 8:30 – 9:15 AM ET

Erica Dyck – Are psychedelics a pathway to better social justice?

Session 11 – 9:20- 9:50 AM ET

NiCole T. Buchanan – Psychedelic JEDIs: Ensuring Justice, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (JEDI) in Psychedelics

Session 12 – 9:50-10:20 am ET

Sunny Strasburg and Phil Wolfson (Indra’s Net Coalition) – Treating Trauma and PTSD Internationally with Sharing Groups—Expression, Sharing of Experiences, Feelings and Coping Strategies Creating Connection and Healing

Panel 4 – 10:20 – 10:50 am ET (Hosted by Chacruna Institute of Psychedelic Plant Medicines)

Erika Dyck, Nicole Buchanan, Sunny Strasburg and Phil Wolfson (Indra’s Net Coalition)

Session 13 – 11:00 – 11:30 am ET

Gang Badoy Capati – Decade In Prison: Snapshots of Justice Philippine-Style 

Session 14 – 11:30 – 12:00 Noon ET

Linda Thai – Nostalgia, the Pain of Going Home: A Former Child Refugee’s Journey of Healing.

Session 15   12:00 – 12:30 pm ET

Mariella Norambuena – Sociopolitical trauma . Perception of use of ICT, treatment of Trauma in Victims of Eye Damage during the Social Outbreak in Chile.

Panel 5 – 12:30 – 1pm ET

Gang Badoy Capati, Linda Thai, Mariella Norambuena

Yoga Practice – 1:00-:1:30 pm ET

Beth Gibbs – 5 Layers of Self-Awareness

Session 16 – 2:15 – 3:00 pm ET

Trina Clayeux – Giving Help and Hope: Give an Hour Case Studies of Trauma & Healing

Session 17 – 3 – 4pm ET

Josefin Wikström – Prison Yoga Project – Trauma Informed Yoga as Complementary Care

Session 18   4:15 – 5:15 pm ET

Oludaré –  Breathing With Orisha

Sunday, January 16, 2022

Networking Day 8:30am – 5pm ET

Please join us on the final day of the Social Justice Summit for a Networking Day.  We have planned several breakout rooms where you can meet and greet fellow attendees to discuss topics being addressed at the summit, share ideas and network.  Sessions will be open to all and you may come and go as you please depending on your areas of interest.

Session Topics and Organizations

Room 1: 

  • 8:30 – 9:15 am: Incarceration and Trauma Informed Programs with Gang Badoy
  • 9:20 – 10:05: Psychedelics, Representation, and Accessibility with Chacruna Institute
  • 10:10 – 10:55: Identity and Somatics with Alta Starr
  • 11:00 – 11:45: Community Solutions with Tata Institute of Social Sciences and Tree of Life Zimbabwe*
  • 11:45 – 12:15: Beth Gibbs : The Five Layers of Self-Awareness / Wellness Bridge Now Yoga Session
  • 12:45 – 1:30: Wellness Practices with Beth Gibbs
  • 1:35 – 2:20: Community Solutions with PATH (Program for Addiction and Trauma Healing) 
  • 2:25 – 3:10: Neurofeedback with Lisa Pendleton
  • 3:15 – 4:00: Community Solutions with Mariah Rooney
  • 4:05 – 4:50: Sociopolitical Trauma with Linda Thai

Room 2: 

  • 8:30 – 9:15 am: Sociopolitical Trauma with Mariella Norembuena
  • 9:20 – 10:05: Accessibility and Inclusion with Give an Hour
  • 10:10 – 10:55: Neurofeedback with Sadar Psyche
  • 11:00 – 11:45: Cultural Narrative and Community Healing of Trauma with Beyond Conflict
  • 11:45 – 12:15: Beth Gibbs : The Five Layers of Self-Awareness / Wellness Bridge Now Yoga Session
  • 12:45 – 1:30: Incarceration and Trauma Informed Programs with Compassionate Prison Project
  • 1:35 – 2:20: Wellness Practices and Trauma with OluDare
  • 2:25 – 3:10: Community Solutions with Playback Theater
  • 3:15 – 4:00: Education and Trauma with Dafna Lender
  • 4:05 – 4:50: Psychedelics, Representation, and Accessibility with Indra’s Net Coalition

*Special Note: The Tata Institute of Social Sciences and Tree of Life met last year at the summit and a beautiful collaboration bloomed between the two organizations. This partnership led to the creation of a concept for trauma-informed community intervention for healthcare workers which was a winner in the UNICEF-The George Institute for Global Health India Health Innovation Challenge.  Congratulations!

Scholarships Available

Trauma Research Foundation is committed to ensuring that our programming is accessible. We are pleased to offer scholarships for the 2022 Social Justice Summit. Please complete the application below to determine your eligibility. We will respond to scholarship requests on a rolling basis. We ask that you allow several days for a response. Thank you!

Hope and Connection in the New Year!

Social Justice Summit 2022 Registration

Full event access

Full access to the 2nd annual social justice summit – join us in virtual community as we explore vitally important issues in the realm of social justice and healing from trauma

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Includes full access to the 2nd annual social justice summit – plus an additional $25 donation to provide scholarships for this summit and other TRF programs.

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To access the summit, login to your TRF user account.  Questions?  Please email [email protected]

The Social Justice Summit's purpose is as follows:

  • To address trauma as a social, political and collective issue, not just an individual experience.
  • To showcase and address the social contexts for and in which trauma happens — Inequality, poverty, racism, homophobia, sexism, war.
  • To address trauma as a social and collective experience.
  • To address the limited accessibility of mental health services and treatment for the most traumatized populations.
  • To showcase and present new models of services that provide mental health support and treatment for underserved, underrepresented people in need of care.
  • To raise funds for scholarships and provide collaborative opportunities and access to all other Trauma Research Foundation programming.

CE Information:

  • Live (must attend live)
  • Enduring (can be done after watching summit recordings – will be available by mid-February)
  • To learn more about the Live CE credit offered for this event, please click below.
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